Call Appointments Prescriptions Pickup RX Home Delivery Directions View Full Website

Pet Fire Safety

Pets are a part of your family, and it’s essential to consider them when making emergency plans. July 15th is National Pet Fire Safety Day and the perfect opportunity to learn more about keeping your furry friends safe.

In this article, we’ll discuss some common fire dangers and what steps you can take to prepare your pet for an emergency.

Fire Dangers and Your Pet

Fire safety is a common household concern. However, when you have pets, there are additional fire hazards you should be aware of. Here are a few things to keep in mind when evaluating fire danger in your home.

  • Open flames

Pets are curious creatures, and open flames can be enticing. Whether you have a lit candle or a roaring fireplace, it’s critical to keep pets at a safe distance to prevent accidental injury.

Never leave an open flame unattended, and keep candles out of your pet’s reach. Wagging tails and curious paws have been known to knock over lit candles and cause a fire. You may also want to consider a barrier to keep pets from getting too close to the fireplace.

  • Stove Knobs

Does your cat enjoy playing with knobs? If you have a stovetop with knobs, this can be a potential fire danger. A cat looking for a new toy or a dog jumping up on the counter can accidentally hit a knob and turn the stove on. Not only can this cause injury to your pet, but it can also ignite items left on the stove and become a serious fire danger.

Because of this, it’s best to keep pets out of the kitchen when possible and consider putting covers on your stove knobs.

  • Electrical Wires

Many pets chew on things they’re not supposed to and can cause damage to items in your home. Unfortunately, this can be a potential fire hazard when it comes to electrical wires.

Damaged wires can spark a fire and are an electrocution risk for your pet. To prevent this from happening, keep electrical wires out of reach. Furniture can be used to block access to electrical outlets, and protective covers are available to create an additional barrier between electrical wires and your pet.

Creating an Emergency Plan

While you can take certain precautions to reduce the fire risk in your home, emergencies can happen at any time. Creating an emergency plan can help you prepare and improve the chances of getting out safely. When creating your family emergency plan, remember to include your pets. Consider assigning a specific family member to gather the pets and get them out of the house safely. This can help ensure your furry friends won’t be overlooked.

Another essential part of your emergency plan is creating an emergency kit. When a fire occurs, you don’t want to waste precious time gathering food and supplies your pet may need. Put together a bag that contains your pet’s essentials, including food, bowls, medication, and leashes. You can also add a copy of your pet’s medical record and vaccine history.

Final Thoughts

Fires happen every day and can have serious consequences for the people and pets you love. We hope these tips have provided some new insight into pet fire safety and how to make sure you are prepared. If you have additional questions or concerns about fire safety and your pet, please give us a call. Our team is here to answer your questions and help you create a safe environment for your furry friends.

Keeping Pets Parasite Free Helps People, Too!

While parasite prevention is essential for your pet’s health, it can also play a critical role in keeping you and your family safe. Some of the parasites that affect pets can be spread to people.

In this article, we’ll discuss which parasites could be a risk to you and how to keep you and your pets parasite free.

Zoonotic Parasites

While many parasites can affect pets, zoonotic parasites can be transmitted from pets to people. Below are a few of the most common zoonotic parasites and what you need to know about them.

  • Tapeworms

The most common zoonotic tapeworm is known as Dipylidium and is found in both dogs and cats. While you can not get this tapeworm directly from your pet, it can be spread by fleas. While it may seem unlikely that you would eat a flea, it can happen accidentally and is most commonly seen in children.

  • Hookworms

Hookworms are another intestinal parasite that you can contract from your pet. Hookworm eggs can be excreted in your pet’s feces and live in the soil for long periods of time. When your skin comes in contact with contaminated feces or soil, the hookworm burrows into your skin. The infected area may become red and is often quite itchy.

  • Toxoplasma

Toxoplasma is an intestinal parasite that is spread to humans through contact with cat feces. Symptoms of toxoplasma infection in people can vary but are usually mild and resemble the flu. However, pregnant women who become infected with Toxoplasma can spread the infection to their unborn children.

Keeping Your Pets Parasite Free

One of the most critical steps in keeping you and your pets safe is parasite prevention. Parasite prevention comes in various forms, including topical treatments, oral medications, and injectables. Some preventatives can protect your pet from multiple parasites. However, it’s essential to ensure your pet is fully protected from fleas, ticks, heartworms, and internal parasites.

If you have questions about your pet’s level of protection, our team is happy to provide recommendations and help make sure your pet is adequately protected.

In addition to preventative care, parasite testing is also critical. Fecal tests can detect intestinal parasites and are recommended during your pet’s annual wellness exam. You should also monitor your pet for any concerning symptoms such as weight loss, diarrhea, or excessive itch.

Reducing Your Risk

While keeping your pet parasite-free is critical, some additional measures can help reduce your risk. Always wash your hands before eating and after handling your pet. When your pet uses the bathroom, clean it up as soon as possible and always dispose of the waste properly.

Because of the increased health risks associated with Toxoplasma infection during pregnancy, the CDC recommends that pregnant women avoid cleaning their cat’s litter box when possible. Instead, ask another family member to help you with the task. If this is not possible, wear disposable gloves and wash your hands thoroughly when you are done.

Final Thoughts

Not only can parasite prevention protect your pet, but it can also help you! In addition to using parasite prevention, remember to be careful when cleaning up after your pet and always practice good hygiene.

If you have additional questions about keeping your pet parasite free, please give us a call. We are happy to set up an appointment to check your pet for parasites and discuss their preventative care.

Our Mission:

We provide the quality care our clients expect and their pets deserve, by relying on the expertise and
compassion of each team member.

 
 
 

Contact Us

Westgate Pet Clinic
4345 France Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55410
Directions to Our Clinic
(612)925-1121
(612)925-6297 Fax
(612)568-1405 Pharmacy

Find Us